Orders may be delayed over Christmas/New Year period. Please note we cannot guarantee delivery before Christmas for orders placed after 16th December 2019.

Miracle Mumma

  • The story of 26 Weeker Miracle Elodie

    At 24+5 weeks I went into birth unit after not being able to feel movements for 28 hours. I had a urine test done, bloods & heart doppler check. My blood pressure was through the roof and I had 3 times the amount of protein in my urine. They decided that they had no choice but to diagnose me with severe early onset pre eclampsia. However, by this stage, it was too late and not even the blood pressure medication was working. 
  • World Prematurity Day 2019

    World Prematurity Day. One in ten babies are born too soon and premature birth remains the leading cause of death in children under five – it is more common than you think and it is on the rise. It can happen to anyone...it happened to me.
  • Blood donors saved our sons lives

    And as I sit here writing this with tears streaming down my face, surrounded by my two precious little NAIT miracles, it is not lost on me how our story could have been completely different. I want to say a personal thankyou to all those who donate blood, from the very bottom of my heart. None of this would have been possible if it weren’t for the generous and selfless donors who took their time to save a life – and not just any life, but our son’s lives. Our difficult journey has been made so much brighter by the goodness of people we have never met and we will forever be in their debt. You do not have to be rich to be generous.
  • The Birth Story of Jack Henry

    As usual, we don't like to do anything to plan! After being admitted on Tuesday 30th April with possible pre-eclampsia and threatened pre-term labour, Dr W decided he would administer steroids, order those precious platelets and monitor mine & baby's health, but bring delivery forward a week to the following Tuesday at 34+6 weeks regardless. We agreed that my body was telling us it was time and we had given our boy the best possible chance on the outside. At first, my body was cooperating...but slowly my blood levels showed developing pre-eclampsia & on Sunday night, I became symptomatic with headaches, abdo pain, high blood pressure & nose bleeds (not to mention those regular tightenings). The next morning (Monday) Dr W came to see me first thing & said that it was time. I thought he meant later that day but he meant NOW, and within minutes I was signing a consent and speaking to anaesthetics! I obviously went into a mad panic. This couldn't be happening again - Scott was at home an hour away with James.
  • NAIT Explained: The Reason Behind the Infusions

    On day one when we visited James in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), the doctors explained he was born with a platelet level of 13, which is classed as ‘severe’. Platelets are a component of the blood essential for clotting, and normal levels are between 140 and 450. Low platelet levels obviously cause bleeding into tissues and subsequent bruising, with severe cases causing irreversible intracranial haemorrhage (bleeding on the brain), resulting in long-term disability or death. The medical staff were describing how each contraction I had would have been like a punch to our poor little man in the womb...
  • And so it begins...

    They measured my cervix and I could immediately see it was a concern. Dr M summed it up with 'it's definitely short for this gestation with beaking and sludge present'. He checked a few more times before he explained that he didn't think I needed to rush to hospital but he would speak to Dr Yoong immediately and that I should prepare for either progesterone or an urgent stitch. He then spent the next 15 minutes with me re-checking measurements, dopplers and the placenta. He explained I also have marginal cord insertion, which is when the umbilical cord attaches to the side of the placenta rather than the middle, causing reduced blood flow. Dr M said they don't usually see the effects of it this early, but it could explain why bubs was already measuring a bit small.
  • The 'High-Risk' Road to Come...Infusions, Scans & Another Pre-Term Delivery

    Since announcing our baby news, I have had a lot of people wish us a healthy and long pregnancy and say, ‘at least the hardest part is over’. And while that is partly true, unfortunately our pregnancy will be high risk and filled with its own struggles. Most people assume this means we will be monitored closely for signs of premature birth with more frequent scans and cervical length checks...yes, my vagina should just set up its own display! However, given the surgical removal of my uterine septum which aimed to give our baby more room to grow, I am crossing everything (mostly my legs when they’re not spread for scans) that this has reduced our risk! The biggest concern is something completely unrelated to this which I will explain now, but will cause our baby to be born premature regardless…
  • Premmie isolation during winter is NO JOKE

    Premmie isolation during winter is no joke. Believe it or not, we don’t stay home during winter and send ourselves stir crazy for the fun of it. But here ARE some fun facts for you: Your 'little cold' could seriously harm a premature child or newborn. Your cough that you think is no longer contagious could actually be deadly. Despite your misguided assumptions, it is not important to expose these little beings to germs when their immune system is virtually non-existent. So...when we politely decline a catch up (even if it’s ‘just a cold’), we’re actually not trying to be rude. When we put signs on our pram asking you 'please don't touch', we're actually not trying to be dramatic. We’re not being over-cautious or unreasonable, we are being cautious and reasonable. We understand that some things are unavoidable, but we’re just trying to keep our babies safe…and alive. But please, feel free roll your eyes and judge us, because despite what you may think, it actually won't make us risk the safety of our child. And if you’re still not convinced, please read this story:
  • Reflux is a bitch, but you're not alone.

    James suffered from reflux very early on. He was that NICU baby that need thickened EBM & continuous feeds, who needed their cot elevated, who needed slow gavages (his heart rate and oxygen levels would drop super fast) and who spilled constantly! In hospital, it was managed quite well. But when he came home? Man, that shit almost broke me. 
  • Wear all the babies!

    After a lot of research and a lot of tips from experienced wearers, I strapped my teeny little man to my chest and in that moment, I felt more in love than ever before. James fell straight to sleep in his favourite place and my heart exploded with happiness. I can’t even describe the feeling, but it was as though he was back where he belonged, curled up in a ball as close to his Mummy as possible. He should have still been in my tummy at this stage, but wow, this was definitely the next best thing. From that moment, I was addicted! I wore James every single day. Some days the jobs got done, and some days they didn’t. But I didn’t care.
  • A premature baby is just that – it was born before its time

    although the road may have been smoother for us, it doesn’t mean it wasn’t as difficult in many other ways. I’ve had a lot of parents throughout the past year say similar things to me, such as “our baby was born at 34 weeks, so definitely not as bad as others”, or “our baby was only 5 weeks early, so not really premature” and I find myself getting defensive for them! Umm, no, you were meant to carry that baby an extra 5 or 6 weeks – that’s a bloody long time that your baby was meant to grow and develop in utero. I find it upsetting that parents of late preterm babies (and even me!) feel they need to minimise the difficulty of having a baby too soon...
  • Update: Our Journey to Baby #2 (Part Five)

    After my successful uterine septum resection surgery in November, I have had a period and we are currently in our first cycle of trying to conceive baby #2! I’m pretty sure I even ovulated all on my own like a big girl! We are obviously super excited but I’m going to be honest, I’ve had a few freak-out moments! Mostly, I’m worried that I won’t love my second child as much as I love James. I know this sounds silly, but after almost 2 years trying to conceive, a miscarriage, a complicated pregnancy and a scary premature birth, James is our little miracle who we thought we might never meet. I almost feel greedy for wanting to add another little babe to the mix.