Miracle Mumma

  • Premmie isolation during winter is NO JOKE

    Premmie isolation during winter is no joke. Believe it or not, we don’t stay home during winter and send ourselves stir crazy for the fun of it. But here ARE some fun facts for you: Your 'little cold' could seriously harm a premature child or newborn. Your cough that you think is no longer contagious could actually be deadly. Despite your misguided assumptions, it is not important to expose these little beings to germs when their immune system is virtually non-existent. So...when we politely decline a catch up (even if it’s ‘just a cold’), we’re actually not trying to be rude. When we put signs on our pram asking you 'please don't touch', we're actually not trying to be dramatic. We’re not being over-cautious or unreasonable, we are being cautious and reasonable. We understand that some things are unavoidable, but we’re just trying to keep our babies safe…and alive. But please, feel free roll your eyes and judge us, because despite what you may think, it actually won't make us risk the safety of our child. And if you’re still not convinced, please read this story:
  • Update! Our Journey to Baby #2: You Matter

    A week ago I had my appointment with my new fertility specialist at Repromed who had been recommended to me by a couple of friends. I have blogged in the past about my previous experience with Repromed being quite clinical and how I felt like a ‘number’, so going back there made me feel a little anxious. But to my surprise, I walked in there and felt somewhat comfortable. I nearly wrote ‘at home’, but that’s a bit of a stretch! In hindsight, I think my feelings associated with Repromed were more to do with my own anxieties rather than the care I received. Anyway, Dr Y called me through and the first thing he said was ‘sorry for keeping you waiting, I was reading your history and really wanted to understand your story before we talked’. Immediate ‘tick’, I liked this guy! And then he said ‘Wow you are so lucky to have James’. Two ticks, what a bloody legend!
  • "We are so incredibly lucky" : The Story of Billie-Rose

    I’ve wanted to share our story for a while now, I just didn’t know how. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to relive everything my partner and I have been through, not to mention my daughter. It was by far the hardest thing we have ever been through, but it has made us stronger and who we are today. I wanted to share our story because I think it is important to raise awareness for prematurity, as it is the number one cause of deaths in infants under 5. Now that’s a scary fact. 1 in 10 babies are born premature. And even less than 1% are born before 27 weeks, making my daughter even more of a little miracle to our family.
  • The Story of Mini Miracle, Eloise

    On the 20th of December at 29 weeks and 2 days I left home at 10:30am to go to a routine appointment with my obstetrician. I had no idea as I left home that morning that I wouldn’t return for 5 days and that when I did I would be a mother. I arrived at my obstetrician’s and the nurse took my blood pressure. Once. Twice. It was high but she said it was no cause for concern yet, she would get the doctor to take it again a bit later as women often get a bit anxious when they first arrive at the rooms and it sends their blood pressure up a little...

  • James is T-W-O

    This year, we had a party for James that was much more casual than his first birthday! To be honest, I hardly thought about it until a few weeks before when I realised it had snuck up on me very quickly. By this stage last year, I had his whole party completely organised, styled and under control. Yet here I was this year, still working on a date! We decided on a quiet morning at home with family and a few close friends...
  • Ivy-Mae: One Year Old Cancer Warrior

    "Ivy-Mae was 8 months old when we discovered the tumor. The first thing we noticed was the iris of her eye slowly changing colour, followed by a white glow in photos. Ivy also couldn’t really open her eye in the sun, she would always close that eye. After some doctors appointments here in our local town, we were rushed down immediately to Sydney Children’s Hospital (Westmead).
  • Opening up about loss: it takes a village

    On Tuesday, as I drove down to have the ultrasound that I knew would change our future one way or the other, I was surprisingly confident. Yes I was terrified that our fate was already determined and there was nothing I could do to change it, but somewhere inside there was hope. Scott met me there and the first thing I noticed was the terror in his eyes. As we were sitting and waiting, he said “I hate this. I’ve never been excited for an ultrasound. Not once, not even with James. We have never had a good experience.” It tore me apart to think that we will never get to celebrate a pregnancy the way others do. We will never get to experience those exciting normality’s without being plagued with fear. Our past experiences had taken that away from us and taught us to be cautious in order to protect our hearts.
  • And now we wait...

    On Monday, I woke at midnight to go to the toilet and noticed my underwear was wet. I just thought I was sweating (eww, I know) or had a little light bladder leakage (yes, it's real) but when I peed, the toilet bowl filled with bright blood. At that moment, everything just stopped. I've felt this feeling too many times but I still can't describe it - everything literally comes crashing down & there's nothing left but numbness...
  • Reflux is a bitch, but you're not alone.

    James suffered from reflux very early on. He was that NICU baby that need thickened EBM & continuous feeds, who needed their cot elevated, who needed slow gavages (his heart rate and oxygen levels would drop super fast) and who spilled constantly! In hospital, it was managed quite well. But when he came home? Man, that shit almost broke me. 
  • We're having a freaking baby!

    The day after I posted my last blog (reminder: negative pregnancy test, irregular cycle & full blown meltdown), I decided to take another test. I was nauseous and tired, and I just felt like something was up, but I had convinced myself I was imagining these symptoms (don't tell me you haven't done it before!) Sure enough, it was negative and I walked away feeling stupid for being a serial pee-on-a-stick offender. A couple of minutes later I walked past the test and saw two lines. The second one was super faint, but it was there. The first thing I did? I giggled! Like you do when you're tipsy & everything is hilarious. I'm putting that down to shock and disbelief...I couldn't believe it. In fact I didn't.
  • Wear all the babies!

    After a lot of research and a lot of tips from experienced wearers, I strapped my teeny little man to my chest and in that moment, I felt more in love than ever before. James fell straight to sleep in his favourite place and my heart exploded with happiness. I can’t even describe the feeling, but it was as though he was back where he belonged, curled up in a ball as close to his Mummy as possible. He should have still been in my tummy at this stage, but wow, this was definitely the next best thing. From that moment, I was addicted! I wore James every single day. Some days the jobs got done, and some days they didn’t. But I didn’t care.
  • Update: Our Journey to Baby #2 (Part Six)

    Today I realised I'm not at all keen on doing the infertility thing again. I'm not playing the constant questioning and waiting game and wasting months while my body dances to it's own fricken beat! So I called Dr S's office, and have booked in to chat about starting clomid. I honestly thought I was strong enough to try on our own & convinced myself we could do it naturally, but it's not worth it. It's now been a year since we decided we wanted another baby, and I'm ready for James to be a big brother. Like now!